Chemistry TWDK Chemistry doodle by Giles Meakin

The science of ‘stuff’, Chemistry seeks to understand what things are made of, and how these constituents behave. This involves studying the interactions between atoms and the larger structures they form, predicting further interactions, and deriving practical applications of this knowledge.

Due to the highly versatile nature of carbon and the way it interacts with the other elements, chemistry is traditionally divided into three main subdisciplines. The first is organic chemistry: the study of molecules built around a framework of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms. The second subdiscipline is inorganic chemistry, which is the study of all of the remaining chemicals and their interactions. Finally, physical chemists crunch numbers to analyse the inherent properties of chemical reactions and apply the laws of physics to chemical phenomena. These three subdisciplines overlap, combine and are applied to many different fields to produce a range of branches impacting on practically every aspect of the world around us.

We've published 16 articles and 25 specialist blog posts about chemistry so far, featuring 338 unanswered chemistry questions! But we're not done yet as there are still plenty of ongoing chemistry research areas to write about, so come back soon!

Recent Chemistry News

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The coronavirus cleaned our air — it might clean the waters, too
29th May, 2020
Cleaner air might make for cleaner waters, too.
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Alaskan Coast at Risk of Catastrophic Landslide and Mega-Tsunami
29th May, 2020
Geoscientists estimate that a mountain slope could collapse into Prince William Sound within a year, and likely within 20 years, triggering devastating waves.
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The Virus and the Cyclone: The Tragedy in India and Bangladesh is Double
28th May, 2020
More than four million people have been forced to abandon their homes and reach emergency shelters, increasing the risk of contagion.
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Why countries don’t count emissions from goods they import
28th May, 2020
Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz I would like to know if New Zealand’s carbon emissions of 0.17% include emissions produced from products manufactured overseas and …

Our latest chemistry articles

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Image credit: via Pixabay.
Pregnancy
There are many unknowns when it comes to pregnancy, and many accepted phenomena are still unexplained, or simply attributed to "hormones" or "the placenta" (a complex and poorly understood organ!)
Image credit: ©Andrew (Flickr, attribution)
Plastics
What happens to plastic when it gets disposed of into the environment, and how might it affect us?
Image credit: ©Tom Bech (attribution)
Keystone species
If a keystone species is lost, the entire ecosystem can collapse.
Image credit: ©Via Wikipedia Commons GONDRAN Alexandre Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0
Particles
On scales too small to see are weird and wonderful particles. Their bizarre properties make up the world around us, yet we hardly know a thing about them!
Image credit: © ©John Fowler (CC BY 2.0) via Flickr
Extraterrestrial life
The search for alien life catches many people's imagination and has always been a very public branch of science. So with all this investigation, why has our search revealed nothing? Are we truly alone in the Universe?
Image credit: Public Domain via Pixabay
Vision
Vision is arguably a human's primary sense - we use it to spot danger and navigate our environment. Despite this, there is still plenty we don't know about how this sense works.

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Our latest chemistry blog posts

Our blog posts focus on a specialist topic.
Many are written by scientists about their ongoing research, others by the TWDK team.

TWDK red science flask
Categorising Things is “Evil”
Thursday 21st of May 2020
TWDK red science flask
POPs
Wednesday 12th of February 2020
TWDK red science flask
TWDK red science flask
TWDK red science flask
Lifetime of a Plastic Bag
Wednesday 19th of June 2019
TWDK red science flask
Can we power the world with HYDROGEN?
Saturday 27th of April 2019
More blog posts about chemistry...

Delve deeper into Chemistry

Can't find what you're looking for? Browse the branches of chemistry that interest you most.

TWDK magnifying glassAnalytical Chemistry looks at what things are made of, and finding new ways to determine what they're made of.

TWDK magnifying glassAstrochemistry is the study of the chemical make-up of the universe, and the reactions and interactions that take place in stars and other astronomical bodies.

TWDK magnifying glassBiochemistry is a broad area of chemistry covering the chemical processes involved in life itself.

TWDK magnifying glassEnvironmental Chemistry tracks chemical processes in soil, air and water, and studies how they interact with humans, plants and animals.

TWDK magnifying glassGeochemistry is the use of Chemistry to study the composition and mechanisms of major geological systems such as Earth.

TWDK magnifying glassGreen Chemistry is concerned with the design and development of new sustainable technologies and products.

TWDK magnifying glassInorganic Chemistry looks at the entire periodic table, its trends, the formation of non-carbon-based compounds and their applications in new technologies.

TWDK magnifying glassMaterials Science deals with the structures and properties of materials.

TWDK magnifying glassNuclear Chemistry is the science of radioactive elements, and studies the effect of radiation on the chemistry of materials.

TWDK magnifying glassOrganic Chemistry focusses on carbon-based compounds such as those that make up life, and deals with molecular reactions and drug syntheses.

TWDK magnifying glassPhysical Chemistry uses mathematical modelling to discover the rate laws, mechanisms and underlying principles behind core chemistry.

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